rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Majestic Glacier Bay
A bald eagle perches on ice in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in Alaska. The park, which covers nearly 5,200 square miles (13,500 square kilometers) of mountains, glaciers and coastlines, is located in the Alaskan panhandle, west of the capital city of Juneau.More than 400,000 people visit Glacier Bay National Park each year. Since no roads lead into the park, it is typically accessed by plane or cruise ship. Visitors to the pristine park share the area with diverse wildlife, including grizzly and black bears, moose, wolves, mountain goats, sea otters, whales, eagles and deer.
(via: Live Science)            
photo: National Park Service

rhamphotheca:

Majestic Glacier Bay

A bald eagle perches on ice in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in Alaska. The park, which covers nearly 5,200 square miles (13,500 square kilometers) of mountains, glaciers and coastlines, is located in the Alaskan panhandle, west of the capital city of Juneau.

More than 400,000 people visit Glacier Bay National Park each year. Since no roads lead into the park, it is typically accessed by plane or cruise ship. Visitors to the pristine park share the area with diverse wildlife, including grizzly and black bears, moose, wolves, mountain goats, sea otters, whales, eagles and deer.

(via: Live Science)            

photo: National Park Service

parislemon
parislemon:

secondverse:

theatlantic:

The World’s Newest Island, Niijima

The Earth is geologically dynamic. Mountains and oceans are created and destroyed over millions of years. Almost nothing is permanent on the face of the planet.
In a human lifespan, it’s easy to ignore this reality. That is, until a volcano creates a new island.
In late November, a few days before Thanksgiving, an eruption began in the Pacific Ocean about 600 miles south of Tokyo in the Ogasawara Islands. Over the last few weeks, an island has formed at the volcanic site. People are calling the new land mass Niijima. 
The island has an area of about 14 acres and it continues to grow. NASA’s Earth Observatory released new images of it today. 
Read more. [Image: NASA]


This is frankly amazing. Human time and geologic time rarely intersect.

Insane.

parislemon:

secondverse:

theatlantic:

The World’s Newest Island, Niijima

The Earth is geologically dynamic. Mountains and oceans are created and destroyed over millions of years. Almost nothing is permanent on the face of the planet.

In a human lifespan, it’s easy to ignore this reality. That is, until a volcano creates a new island.

In late November, a few days before Thanksgiving, an eruption began in the Pacific Ocean about 600 miles south of Tokyo in the Ogasawara Islands. Over the last few weeks, an island has formed at the volcanic site. People are calling the new land mass Niijima. 

The island has an area of about 14 acres and it continues to grow. NASA’s Earth Observatory released new images of it today.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

This is frankly amazing. Human time and geologic time rarely intersect.

Insane.